Guidelines for informal "bring some images" sessions

These guidelines apply to internal "informal" sessions such as "bring a travel panel", "10 images in 10 minutes", and image appraisal in Digital Workshops. The syllabus for those events should set the expectations for members preparing work to bring along.

The purpose of these guidelines is to help ensure that any such session runs smoothly, so that all concerned are satisfied that their work has been handled effectively, and the audience has a good time. And also to demonstrate to visitors that we are a society worth joining!


Prepare the right images

Scope

These sessions are normally over-subscribed, with more work available than can comfortably be shown in the available time.

Ensure that the images conform to the theme of the session, and that there is the right amount of work for the time available. The clues are typically in the syllabus! If the syllabus says "your latest trip summed up in 4, 5 or 6 images", highest priority must be given to latest trips.

Duration

There may be a good reason why there should not be more than 6 or 10 images respectively. But even if it is agreed that more images can be shown, the time limit is typically inflexible. So "... summed up in 4, 5 or 6 images" means that if you have 12 images, they must be shown in the time that 6 images would normally be shown. And "... in 10 minutes" really does mean at most 10 minutes.

There are at most 100 minutes available in a normal evening session, allowing for announcements and the coffee break, and 90 minutes is more realistic. Except for "10 images in 10 minutes", where the number of workers will be arranged in advance, there are typically at least 10 people wanting to show work. Even on a light evening there will be no more than 12 minutes each. Often there will be no more than 8 minutes each, or less, including discussion. Plan and rehearse accordingly!

If possible, be flexible about the time needed. For example, rather than have a single Pictures-to-EXE show of 10 minutes, consider having 3 shows of two, three, and five minutes.


General principle

If you take full responsibility for the handling of your images, there are typically few constraints on the work you can show. You can probably show 2-metre wide panoramas if you ensure that there is a suitable way of illuminating your prints. You can show 6x6 slides if you ensure that there is a suitable projector. You can show digital images in just about any format you choose if you arrange suitable software, with someone familiar with it available to operate the projection system such as the Shuttle.

But if you want to use the standard equipment and software, and especially if you want someone else to show your work without advance notice, you must conform to the guidelines here. The society will try to ensure that there are equipment and people available to handle such work, but they may not be able to handle work outside this specification within the time and quality constraints.


Audio

We don't normally set up audio equipment for such sessions. If you require it, give at least one week's notice. If you bring your own equipment, give advance notice, and preferably arrive early so that the system can be configured before the session. (Or else it may be configured during the break).


Prints and slides

Unless otherwise specified, informal sessions will be able to accommodate prints conforming to Clubworker and Exhibition size rules. There may not be a lightbox available at Digital Workshop sessions because of where they are held, and prints may be illuminated using the projector.

Unless otherwise specified, informal sessions will be able to accommodate slides conforming to Clubworker and Exhibition rules. But slides cannot normally be shown at Digital Workshops because there will not be a slide projector. (And they are typically out of scope at such a Workshop).


Self-executing files, for example Pictures-to-EXE

File formats

These pages don't provide format guidelines for self-executing files. (We use Windows XP or later).

However, an assumption is that if the individual images incorporated into self-executing files conform to the JPEG guidelines below, they will be projected at high quality. It is likely (but not certain) that if the JPEGs are different from that, the self-executing files will adapt them to our projector reasonably well.

Media

CDs, DVDs, and USB Drives are normally acceptable. USB Drives are preferred. Other media may be handled if agreed in advance.

Folders

Either there should be no folders, or there should be a simple unambiguous folder structure.

File names

Each self-executing file should have a name that identifies the worker concerned, and if there is more than one such file, some additional meaningful name. For example "Joe Bloggs - China".


Individually projected digital images (JPEGs)

File formats

Images that are not supplied as a self-executing file must be supplied as a set of JPEGs.

The guidelines for the format of JPEGs are at: Guidelines for digital images. That page illustrates a way to validate their format, and it is highly recommended that some such simple and fast check be made. Experience has shown that a significant proportion of images submitted for digital projection have some sort of format error.

Media

CDs, DVDs, and USB Drives are normally acceptable. USB Drives are preferred. Other media may be handled if agreed in advance.

Folders

JPEGs must be supplied in folders. Each set of JPEGs that is to be treated as a single show should have its own folder. This should have a name that identifies the worker concerned, and if there is more than one such folder, some additional meaningful name. For example "Joe Bloggs - China".

File names

The software used to project the JPEGs will normally be configured to show the JPEGs in alphabetical order. To avoid ambiguity, it is best to ensure that the leading part of the name is sufficient to determine the order: for example, "01 Beijing.jpg", "02 Shanghai.jpg", "03 Forbidden City.jpg", etc.


Hand-in

People wanting to show work should make this known by the start of the session, so that time can be budgeted, by allocating the available time evenly among all workers or some other method.

In order to ensure the session runs smoothly, projection will be done directly from the Shuttle's desktop or folder structure, or possibly from a USB Drive. Experience has shown that it is not a good practice to project from CD or DVD. Therefore, individual self-executing files, or folders of JPEGs, will be copied from CDs or DVDs before they are projected. This is the reason for the some of the file name and folder name guidelines above.

Where possible, the work to be projected will be copied to the Shuttle before the start of the session, to avoid wasting time during the session. Alternatively, it can be copied during the break. Ideally, workers should hand-in their work before the session starts.

 

(Guidelines published 24 October 2008)